New Law to help with European Naiad

CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — The state is reminding boaters to be aware of a new law that went into effect this year that prohibits the transport of aquatic plants on their trailers and other measures aimed at combating the spread of invasive species.

The law, which went into effect on Jan. 1, is part of an effort to combat the spread of aquatic plants and animals that are not native to New Hampshire’s lakes, ponds and rivers. Violators could face fines up to $200.

Freshwater aquatic invasive plants and animals are not naturally found in New Hampshire’s lakes, ponds, and rivers. Because they are not native, they have no predators nor diseases which allow them to spread quickly and dominate freshwater ecosystems.

New Hampshire has 74 infested lakes and 11 infested rivers.

The quality of our waters is extremely valuable, both as a natural and economic resource. . They can easily be transported to new waters by boats, motors, trailers, fishing equipment, live-wells, bait buckets, diving gear and other aquatic recreational equipment. Check your boat and equipment and remove any plants or other materials—milfoil and other invasives can easily adhere to propellers and many other catch points.

Invasives can also be put into our waters by individuals who are not aware of the environmental and economic damages these nuisance plants and animals can cause. Never release plants, fish or animals into a body of water unless they came out of that body of water. It’s the law!

It’s the Law

RSA 487:16-d requires boaters to drain their boat and other equipment that holds water, including live wells and bilges, when leaving a waterbody.

European Naiad

Boater

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